Granger man invents tool for easily measuring liquid ingredients

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By: Lydia Sheaks
lsheaks@elkharttruth.com

Courtesy of John Wegener

Cooking a lot means a lot of dirty dishes, and a Granger man wants to fix that.

John Wegener has designed a plastic squeeze bottle that dispenses an exact measurement of liquid ingredients. Cooks who use it won’t need to get out multiple measuring spoons, he said.

“My wife and I cook a lot and we were just talking about the mess of stuff we had to clean up—the teaspoons, the tablespoons, the quarter spoons,” he said. “We just got tired of cleaning everything up.”

So they made a prototype bottle using a 3-D printer. The bottle squeezed out a teaspoon of liquid.

But when the couple showed it to friends, they realized people wanted the option of more than one measurement.

That’s how the current design was born. The Liquidy-Split! bottle measures between ¼ teaspoon and one tablespoon in ¼ teaspoon increments.

Users simply dial the amount they want and squeeze away. The liquid can be stored in the squeeze bottle as well.

Wegener launched a campaign via the crowdfunding website Kickstarter to pay for his first production of several thousand bottles. As of today, he’s raised almost $4,700 of the $5,500 he needs.

Everyone who backs the Kickstarter campaign at $10 or more before the campaign ends this Saturday, April 12, will get a bottle this summer, which is when Wegener hopes to have them finished.

A 3-D printer can’t handle making parts with a food-safe plastic, so Wegener is ordering most of his parts from two Indiana companies — Indiana Plastics in Elkhart and Indiana Bottle Company in Scottsburg.

Wegener hopes to get the bottles into stores like Crate and Barrel and Williams-Sonoma, and he’ll be selling them on his website too.

He’s also interested in getting the bottle to people who have essential tremor disorder and can’t hold measuring cups steady when cooking.

And although Liquidy-Split is designed for cooks, Wegener has heard from people who want to use it to put chemicals in fish tanks. A company in New York has shown interest in selling the bottles for this purpose, he said.

To learn more about Liquidy-Split!, visit the Facebook page or website, liquidy-split.com. The Kickstarter page is open until Saturday, April 12.

Follow reporter Lydia Sheaks on Twitter at @LydiaSheaks
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